Media tagged Asian/Pacific Islander

H&M "Close the Loop" ad

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H&M Close the Loop video is an advertisement for the clothing company’s sustainable fashion through recycling clothes campaign. The ad features a diverse representation of models that are different sizes, ages, genders, sexualities, religions, races, ethnicities, varying degrees of able-bodiedness, and people wearing and presenting their hair - including under arm hair, beards, and head hair - in different styles. The ad features a voice-over saying commonly stated and sometimes contradictory fashion rules and advice while images of diverse, fashionable people in various settings challenge assumptions about these rules. The ad closes with text urging people to leave unwanted garments in any H&M store so that the company can reuse or recycle them into new clothes.

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Hollywood Chinese

About

Hollywood Chinese is a 2007 documentary by Academy Award winner Arthur Dong that surveys the representations of Chinese and other Asian citizens throughout the history of American cinema. Topics include the general invisibility of Asians in popular films, the use of white actors to portray Asian characters, and the common stereotypes that are repeatedly associated with Asian characters in these portrayals. Dong’s film features clips from almost 100 films as well as interviews with actors, directors, and writers who have wrestled with the “tangled history of race and representation” that characterize the presence of Chinese and other Asian Americans in US cinema.

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If Asians Said the Stuff White People Say

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This BuzzFeed video is part of a series of videos that call out and satirize stereotypes and racial microaggressions, or the everyday, often unintentional, marginalizing interactions racial and ethnic minorities experience in the U.S.

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I’m Asian, But I’m Not…

About

“I’m Asian, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Asians by showing a diverse range of Asian American young adults talking about Asian identity and stereotypes. The first half of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Asian, but I’m not..” and the second half shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Asian, what are you?” For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m not quiet,” and another woman says, “I’m Asian, but most people think I’m Latina.” Another woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m fifth generation.” A man says, “I’m Asian, but I’m over six feet tall,” and another says, “I’m Asian, but I’m from Kansas.” In the second half of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Asian, and I’m Hispanic,” “I’m Asian and I’m also an LGBT activist,” “I’m Asian and I love talking about my feelings with my parents,” “I’m Asian and a professional cyclist,” and “I’m Asian, and I’m an extrovert.” The video ends with the message: “Don’t let stereotypes define who you are.”

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Is that Snapchat filter racist?

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Snapchat, the social media messaging app, offers filters that users can overlay on top of their own photos, to alter their appearance. While many of these filters are marketed as humorous, several have been accused of being culturally insensitive and racist. On April 20, 2016, a day also known as ‘420,’ a number associated with marijuana use, Snapchat offered a one-day Bob Marley filter. The filter made users’ skin darker, gave them dreadlocks, and a Bob Marley style cap. A number of users complained that the filter was in effect ‘digital blackface’ and insulting as it trivialized Marley as a ‘stoner.’ Snapchat defended the filter saying it was done as a tribute to Bob Marley’s music with the permission of his estate. Just a few months later in August 2016, Snapchat released another filter that gave users slit eyes and contorted facial features. This filter was quickly accused of digital yellowface. After many complained, Snapchat removed the filter, which it said was ‘anime-inspired.’ Snapchat has also been criticized for its ‘beauty’ filter which makes eyes bigger, but noses and faces slimmer. Many say it reinforces Western standards of beauty.

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