Media tagged Behind the Camera

“Actors of Color Get Real About What It's Like To Play a Stereotype”

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In Febuary 2015, Upworthy published a video that brought together actors of color to describe their experiences at auditions for the U.S. entertainment industry. The actors recount being told by casting directors to act in a stereotypical fashion and being typecasted based on their race and ethnicity. The clip uses personal stories to challenge accusations that the film industry is too Eurocentric and therefore, leaves few roles for actors of color to audition for. The clip cites various studies supporting the use of diverse casts stating that nearly 70% of casting calls prefer white actors, that films with relatively diverse casts excel at the box office and in returns on investment, and that television shows reflecting the nation’s diversity excel in ratings. So with potential for better ratings and better returns, the video asks viewers, “What’s the new excuse?” Upworthy is a website for viral content that promotes progressive stories tackling political and social issues.

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Ageism in Hollywood

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This clip comes from a CNN television show calledShowbiz Todayin the 1980s and 1990s. It reports on a 1989 conference of the Writer's Guild of America that focused on ageism in the entertainment industry, especially as it pertained to not hiring writers and producers over the age of 40. It shows writers and producers who are considered to old too write material that would appeal to the 18-30 consumer demographic.

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Always #LikeAGirl Campaign – Run, Throw, Fight Like a Girl

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This video is part of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, a brand of feminine hygiene products. The campaign aims to keep girls’ confidence high during puberty and into adulthood, since “like a girl” is often used as an insult for girls and boys, which negatively affects the confidence and self-esteem of girls from a young age and especially at puberty. In the video, a production crew is shown filming and asking individual girls, boys, and adults to show them the first thing that comes to mind when they ask them to show them what it looks like to run like a girl, fight like a girl, and throw like a girl. In response, these young people and adults act out stereotypes associated with femininity, such as weakness, shallowness, and inability to fight, throw, and run. The next section of the video shows what happened when they asked younger girls the same questions, and their responses are markedly different, in that they confidently use their strength to run, fight, and throw. The next question on the screen is then, “When did something ‘Like a Girl’ become an insult?,” and it shows some of the young respondents processing that question and the actions they just acted out. The producers are shown asking if some of women would like to redo their previous actions, and one of the women says yes. At the end of the video, the words “Let’s make #LikeAGirl mean amazing things” appears, and then a woman is shown running forward while another’s voice says, “why can’t ‘run like a girl’ mean ‘win the race’?” The video closes with the Always logo, and the message, “rewrite the rules,” and an invitation to join the #LikeAGirl campaign.

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Always #LikeAGirl Campaign – Stronger Together

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This video is part of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, a brand of feminine hygiene products. The campaign aims to keep girls’ confidence high during puberty and into adulthood, since “like a girl” is often used as an insult for girls and boys, which negatively affects the confidence and self-esteem of girls from a young age and especially at puberty. This video shows how the campaign is trying to change what it means to do something “like a girl,” showing a compilation of home videos and personal stories from strong, confident girls and women all over the world doing activities such as dribbling multiple basketballs at once, scoring baskets, playing tennis, doing chemistry and math, rock climbing, playing hockey, riding horses, ice skating, running, doing gymnastics, luging, dirt biking, and kickboxing as they confidently state that they are doing these things “like a girl.” The video ends with a call to action, to join the campaign and share your own stories to rewrite the rules and change what it means to do something “like a girl.”

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Always #LikeAGirl Campaign – Unstoppable

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This video is part of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, a brand of feminine hygiene products. The campaign aims to keep girls’ confidence high during puberty and into adulthood, since “like a girl” is often used as an insult for girls and boys, which negatively affects the confidence and self-esteem of girls from a young age and especially at puberty. This video highlights the limitations and boundaries that girls feel pressured to conform to, including the things they are expected to be able to do or not do because they are girls. For example, one girl talks about how she feels like she has been told that she cannot be brave, and another says that she cannot be the one doing the rescuing because it’s always boys doing the rescuing in stories. In the video, the girls are answering the production crew’s questions about these pressures, and are asked to write down one of the things they mentioned on the side of a white cardboard box. They are then invited to physically tear down these limitations, by breaking up or overturning the boxes. Throughout the video, messages such as “Always wants every girl to stay confident…so nothing can stop her” are shown. The video closes with the Always logo, and the message, “rewrite the rules,” and an invitation to join the #LikeAGirl campaign.

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