Media tagged Behind the Camera

Mad Men - Don Loves Roger Remix

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In this video, scenes from seasons 1-4 of the AMC television series Mad Men are re-edited together in way that dramatically changes the plot of the show. In the real Mad Men, which takes place in a fictional advertising agency in the 1960s, characters Don and Roger are both notoriously sexist, constantly being unfaithful to their wives and disrespectful of their female coworkers. In part, audiences are expected to understand their behavior as native to the era in which the show is set, and a major theme of the series is watching Don and Roger react to the changes happening rapidly around them, including the women's rights movement. In addition, for many viewers, Don and Roger's debauched behavior is part of pleasure of the show. In this video, clips from Mad Men are stitched together so Roger's marriage ends not because of his affair with Don's secretary, but because of an affair with Don. This remix was produced by Pop Culture Pirate, an artist and activist named Elisa Kreisinger. Kreisinger is interested both in changing the meaning of texts to challenge people's assumptions and in promoting the Fair Use of copyrighted materials.

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Matt Damon interrupts Effie Brown to explain diversity in filmmaking

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This video clip is from the fourth season (2015) of Project Greenlight, an American documentary television series on HBO that follows first-time filmmakers as they are given the chance to direct a movie. In this video segment, a group of mostly White male producers, including Matt Damon, famous actor and one of the executive producers of the show, are sitting together evaluating the projects. There is one other (White) woman, but the only person of color in the group is Effie Brown, an experienced Hollywood producer who has produced seventeen feature films. As they are discussing one of the films, Effie Brown brings up a concern that the only black person in the movie is a prostitute that is slapped by her white pimp, and that it may be important to be aware of who is selected to direct a scene and characters like that, because of the representational significance of that being the only black person on screen in the film. Matt Damon interrupts to argue that the directing team had already talked about the same issue that Effie was bringing up, and she disagrees. He then proceeds to interrupt and talk over her again, explaining what he views diversity in films to be, saying, “When we’re talking about diversity, you do it in the casting of the film, not the casting of the show,” meaning that diversity concerns only matter when thinking about who is onscreen, and not who is behind the scenes writing, directing, and producing movies. 

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Nicki Minaj on Bossing Up

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This backstage footage features Nicki Minaj’s commentary on the different standards encountered by female performers compared to their male counterparts. Minaj begins by contending, “you have to be a beast – that’s the only way they respect you.”  She then contrasts her own behavior with that of notoriously demanding male stars – namely, Lil Wayne – for whom respect comes easily. Exasperated, Minaj suggests, “when you’re a girl, you have to be everything. It’s not enough to be good at what you do. You have to be sweet, and you have to be sexy, and you have to be this… I can’t be all those things at once, I’m a human being.”

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Roles of Latinas in Movies

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This poster advertises the New York Latino Film Festival. It features an infographic depicting the kinds of jobs Latina characters have in movies to demonstrate the frequency with which they appear as maids, as opposed to other professions. The tag line of the poster reads, "Films and Movies. Come See the Difference." At the very bottom of the poster are the logos of the various sponsors of the film festival.

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Seventeen Magazine - Body Peace Treaty

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In 2012, a 14-year-old girl named Julia Bluhm started a petition on Change.org urging the popular Seventeen Magazine to bring attention to the problem of airbrushed images of celebrities. She wrote: “Here’s what lots of girls don’t know. Those “pretty women” that we see in magazines are fake. They’re often photoshopped, air-brushed, edited to look thinner, and to appear like they have perfect skin…As part of SPARK Movement, a girl-fueled, national activist movement, I’ve been fighting to stop magazines, toy companies, and other big businesses from creating products, photo spreads and ads that hurt girls’ and break our self-esteem…That’s why I’m asking Seventeen Magazine to commit to printing one unaltered -- real -- photo spread per month. I want to see regular girls that look like me in a magazine that’s supposed to be for me.”

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