Media tagged Children and Media

Boy Toys Wordle

About

This "word cloud" was created a writer named Crystal Smith and posted on her blog "The Achilles effect". The author analyzed 27 different commercials from several leading toy brands marketed toward boys -- including Hot Wheels, Matchbox, Kung Zhu, Nerf, Transformers, Beyblades, and Bakugan. She then created this image based on the 658 words that were used in these commercials. The larger the word in the "word cloud", the more often it is used.

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"F-Bombs for Feminism: Potty-Mouthed Princesses Use Bad Word for Good Cause," FCKH8 (EXPLICIT)

about

Created by activist for-profit T-shirt company FCKH8.com, “Potty-Mouthed Princesses Drop F-Bombs for Feminism” is a video featuring young girls assertively challenging gender inequality and stereotypes while wearing tiaras and princess dresses. The video begins by showing young girls upholding stereotypical visions of girlhood in tiaras and princess dresses as they say "pretty." The video quickly takes a sharp and explicit turn as one of the girls deflates the stereotype, cliaming,  “What the fuck? I’m not a pretty fuckin’ helpless princess in distress.” The other girls join her to fight back against gender stereotypes, asking viewers to consider what is truly offensive--their language or the range of political and social inequities women face daily (the pay gap, sexual harassment and assault, slut shaming, beauty standards, etc.). The girls continually “drop the F-bomb” and use other strong language as they give these facts about inequality. The video ends with two adult women wearing the FCKH8 t-shirts (for sale for $15), who make light of the girls' language and ask us to focus instead on the sexism that women still face.

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Free to Be You and Me

About

Free To Be… You And Me was a project spanning multiple media (including a book, record album, and TV special) from the early 1970s. The main message of Free To Be is gender equality among children and their parents.  Developed by actress Marlo Thomas and feminist publication Ms. magazine, Free To Be was a reaction to rigid sex roles and cultural values of the 1950s and 1960s. Free To Be was the first children’s media project of its kind to actively confront sexual and racial stereotypes.

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Girl Toys Wordle

About

This "word cloud" was created a writer named Crystal Smith and posted on her blog "The Achilles effect". The author analyzed 32 different commercials from several leading toy brands marketed toward girls -- including Zhu Zhu Pets, Zhu Zhu Babies, Bratz Dolls, Barbie, Moxie Girls, Easy Bake Ovens, Monster High Dolls, My Little Pony, Littlest Pet Shop, Polly Pocket, and FURREAL Friends. She then created this image based on the 432 words that were used in these commercials. The larger the word in the "word cloud", the more often it is used.

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GoldieBlox and Rube Goldberg “Princess Machine” ad

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This 2103 advertisement is for GoldieBlox, a toy company that makes engineering toys for girls with the mission of getting girls building. The company was founded by Debbie Sterling, a Stanford University trained mechanical engineer who wanted to “disrupt the pink aisle” and provide girls with more options for toys beyond dolls and princesses. The ad shows three girls watching a stereotypically girly and pink television advertisement with unimpressed looks of boredom and inability to relate on their faces. The background music changes as the girls grab tool belts, hardhats, and safety goggles, and are then shown participating in a complex Rube Goldberg “Princess Machine,” where a series of deliberately engineered chain reactions turn objects from the inside and outside of the house into a fun, complex contraption used to ultimately change the channel from the stereotypical tv commercial at the beginning of the ad. The new commercial the girls see shows Goldie the cartoon character from GoldieBlox who is a kid inventor that loves to build, and advertises the company’s engineering toys with the tagline, “toys for future engineers.” The video ends with the three girls in the living room where they started, wearing the tool belt, hardhat, and safety goggles and standing with arms crossed and expectant looks on their faces.

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