Media tagged Feminism

GoldieBlox and Rube Goldberg “Princess Machine” ad

about

This 2103 advertisement is for GoldieBlox, a toy company that makes engineering toys for girls with the mission of getting girls building. The company was founded by Debbie Sterling, a Stanford University trained mechanical engineer who wanted to “disrupt the pink aisle” and provide girls with more options for toys beyond dolls and princesses. The ad shows three girls watching a stereotypically girly and pink television advertisement with unimpressed looks of boredom and inability to relate on their faces. The background music changes as the girls grab tool belts, hardhats, and safety goggles, and are then shown participating in a complex Rube Goldberg “Princess Machine,” where a series of deliberately engineered chain reactions turn objects from the inside and outside of the house into a fun, complex contraption used to ultimately change the channel from the stereotypical tv commercial at the beginning of the ad. The new commercial the girls see shows Goldie the cartoon character from GoldieBlox who is a kid inventor that loves to build, and advertises the company’s engineering toys with the tagline, “toys for future engineers.” The video ends with the three girls in the living room where they started, wearing the tool belt, hardhat, and safety goggles and standing with arms crossed and expectant looks on their faces.

read more

Grrlyshow Film Trailer

About

The Grrlyshow is an independent, 18 minute film by Kara Herold that explores the development of the “girly zine” subculture. Zines are independently produced and distributed, homemade reading materials typically covering alternative subjects that are not printed by mainstream media. "Grrly" is typically associated with the Riot Grrrl movement of the 1990s, in which punk rock was used as the medium to disseminate feminist messages of empowerment and political activism. The trailer and film intersperse first person, head-shot interviews with clips from the zines and 1950's television-style vignettes.

read more

Helen Mirren on Hollywood

About

This is a speech given by British Actress Helen Mirren at The Hollywood Reporter’s “Women in Entertainment” breakfast in 2010, where she was the recipient of the Sherry Lansing Leadership Award. Her audience was female producers, writers and directors, many of whom mentor younger women. She expresses frustration at women being limited by socially prescribed gender roles, saying “Aren’t you sick of being told what you can and can’t do?” Aside from mentorship, Mirren argues for the importance of economic independence in securing power for women. Quoting numbers that demonstrate the immense buying power of women, she is upset that Hollywood “continues to pander to the 18-25 year old male and his penis.”

read more

H&M "Close the Loop" ad

about

H&M Close the Loop video is an advertisement for the clothing company’s sustainable fashion through recycling clothes campaign. The ad features a diverse representation of models that are different sizes, ages, genders, sexualities, religions, races, ethnicities, varying degrees of able-bodiedness, and people wearing and presenting their hair - including under arm hair, beards, and head hair - in different styles. The ad features a voice-over saying commonly stated and sometimes contradictory fashion rules and advice while images of diverse, fashionable people in various settings challenge assumptions about these rules. The ad closes with text urging people to leave unwanted garments in any H&M store so that the company can reuse or recycle them into new clothes.

read more

How White Feminism can look just like sexism comic

about 

Above is an excerpt from “How White Feminism can look just like sexism,” a comic created by graphic artist Alli Kirkham to address how many of the same arguments people use to dismiss the value of feminism are used by White feminists to dismiss the value of addressing race and racism. In a series of side-by-side frames, she shows two people talking to illustrate statements criticizers use to argue against, dismiss, or minimize the experiences and values of feminists, and compares it with another frame that shows how the same white feminists say similar kinds of things to people of color about race and anti-racism.

read more