Media tagged Film

Carmen Miranda - Copacabana

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This is a clip from the 1947 musical comedy film Copacabana. The clip is of a musical number by the film's star Carmen Miranda, a Brazilian singer, dancer and actress who was a celebrity in the 1930s-1950s. In addition to her talent as a performer, she was also known as a sex symbol, marketed as "exotic” and a stereotypical "Brazilian bombshell." Miranda's signature costume was a  revealing dress and colorful "tutti-frutti" turban, a glamorized version of the traditional costume of poor Brazilian women of primarily African descent. Miranda first became a star in Brazil, and then in the United States, even performing at the White House. Her career was encouraged by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor Policy," which sought to improve foreign relations between the United States and Latin America though cultural exchange rather than military intervention. However, as she became more popular in the United States, Miranda became less popular in Brazil. Some Brazilians felt that she was succumbing to American commercialism. Others, particularly the upper class, believed that she was representing Brazil negatively because her image appropriated from the most economically and racially marginalized groups within Brazilian society. In addition, Miranda often played characters from many Latin America countries, and some felt that this lead United States audiences to believe that all Latin American cultures were the same. In this clip, Miranda performs a high-energy version of the Brazilian song "Tico-Tico no Fubá" while other characters-- including her character's husband, played by comedian Groucho Marx-- look on and comment about her performance.

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Charlie's Angels - Full Throttle

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The first video is a trailer that was produced as a way to promote Charlie's Angels Full Throttle. The blockbuster film of 2003 was a sequel to 2000's Charlie's Angeles, which itself was based upon a popular 1970s television show. Played by Drew Barrymore, Cameron Diaz, and Lucy Lui, the crime-fighting Angels team is portrayed as an elite female unit that is courageous and strong. They're also not afraid to use their good looks and sexual prowess as a way to trick their unwitting enemies into getting caught. The sequel features the three Angels taking on a former colleague, played by Demi Moore.

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Chris Rock Hosts Academy Awards

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This is an excerpt from the 77th Academy Awards ceremony hosted by actor and comedian Chris Rock in 2005. In this skit, Rock suggests that there is a discrepancy between the movies celebrated by the Academy and nominated for Best Picture, and the movies that are most popular and enjoyed by everyday viewers. He furthers this contrast by visiting the Magic Johnson Theaters, a cineplex in downtown Los Angeles, to ask audiences to name their favorite movie of the year. The African American audience members list movies such as “Alien vs Predator,” “Saw 2,” "Chronicles of Riddick,” and "White Chicks," none of which were nominated for Academy Awards. When he asks whether they have seen the movies nominated for Best Picture such as “Sideways,” “Million Dollar Baby,” and “Finding Neverland” they all say ‘no," and even scoff at the suggestion that these movies might be among their favorites. Mid-way through the skit, he interviews Academy member and actor, Albert Brooks, who has seen all the nominated movies but emphatically and ironically claims "White Chicks" was the best movei of the year. The skit ends with a shot of actor and comedian Martin Lawrence, defiantly claiming that he is deserving of an Oscar statuette. 

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Do The Right Thing "Race Off" (EXPLICIT)

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Do The Right Thing is a highly controversial 1989 film, written and directed by Spike Lee, about a Brooklyn neighborhood gripped by racial tension. In this scene, two of the film's main characters, Pino and Mookie have a candid conversation about race and racism. Mookie points out Pino's hypocrisy: he is racist, but many of his heroes happen to be African-Americcan. As their conversation gets heated, the director takes the audience outside of the scene in the pizza parlor and outside of the story by inserting a series of characters--all different races--yelling racial stereotypes and epithets directly into the camera. The scene ends when the local DJ calls for everyone to take a time out.

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Do The Right Thing -- Wall of Shame (EXPLICIT)

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Do The Right Thing is a highly controversial 1989 film, written and directed by Spike Lee, about a Brooklyn neighborhood gripped by racial tension. In this scene, a young black man and his friends demand that Sal, the Italian-American proprietor of Famous Pizza, add some black celebrities to his restaurant’s wall, which operates in a mostly black neighborhood. Things quickly escalate to the point of violence.

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