Media tagged Gender Inequality

48 Things Women Hear In A Lifetime (That Men Just Don’t)

About

This 2015 video created by American online news source Huffington Post’s Jessica Samakow and Oliver Noble features a diverse range of girls, teens, young adults, and women delivering the kinds of subtle, often-conflicting, everyday messages women and girls hear about their bodies, emotions, minds, families, careers, and decisions throughout their lifetime. For example, some of the messages start with young girls saying, “don’t be so bossy!” and “your dad will have the chase the boys away when you’re older.” These messages are followed by the teens, young adults, and older adults saying comments such as, “you need to wax your eyebrows,” “don’t wear that to school, you’re gonna distract the boys,” “don’t be a slut,” “no guy wants to have sex with a virgin,” “how much did you have to drink that night?” “what were you wearing that night?” “why are you getting so emotional?,” “don’t be so dramatic,” “it must be that time of the month,” “stop being such an attention whore!,” “you’d be really pretty if you just made an effort,” “you’d be much prettier if you smiled,” “your biological clock is ticking,” “you’re not taking your husband’s last name?,” “you’re going to let someone else raise your kids when you go back to work?,” “your husband cooks dinner? You really have him well trained,” and ends with an older woman saying, “you must have been beautiful when you were younger.”

read more

Always #LikeAGirl Campaign – Run, Throw, Fight Like a Girl

about

This video is part of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, a brand of feminine hygiene products. The campaign aims to keep girls’ confidence high during puberty and into adulthood, since “like a girl” is often used as an insult for girls and boys, which negatively affects the confidence and self-esteem of girls from a young age and especially at puberty. In the video, a production crew is shown filming and asking individual girls, boys, and adults to show them the first thing that comes to mind when they ask them to show them what it looks like to run like a girl, fight like a girl, and throw like a girl. In response, these young people and adults act out stereotypes associated with femininity, such as weakness, shallowness, and inability to fight, throw, and run. The next section of the video shows what happened when they asked younger girls the same questions, and their responses are markedly different, in that they confidently use their strength to run, fight, and throw. The next question on the screen is then, “When did something ‘Like a Girl’ become an insult?,” and it shows some of the young respondents processing that question and the actions they just acted out. The producers are shown asking if some of women would like to redo their previous actions, and one of the women says yes. At the end of the video, the words “Let’s make #LikeAGirl mean amazing things” appears, and then a woman is shown running forward while another’s voice says, “why can’t ‘run like a girl’ mean ‘win the race’?” The video closes with the Always logo, and the message, “rewrite the rules,” and an invitation to join the #LikeAGirl campaign.

read more

Always #LikeAGirl Campaign – Stronger Together

about

This video is part of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, a brand of feminine hygiene products. The campaign aims to keep girls’ confidence high during puberty and into adulthood, since “like a girl” is often used as an insult for girls and boys, which negatively affects the confidence and self-esteem of girls from a young age and especially at puberty. This video shows how the campaign is trying to change what it means to do something “like a girl,” showing a compilation of home videos and personal stories from strong, confident girls and women all over the world doing activities such as dribbling multiple basketballs at once, scoring baskets, playing tennis, doing chemistry and math, rock climbing, playing hockey, riding horses, ice skating, running, doing gymnastics, luging, dirt biking, and kickboxing as they confidently state that they are doing these things “like a girl.” The video ends with a call to action, to join the campaign and share your own stories to rewrite the rules and change what it means to do something “like a girl.”

read more

Always #LikeAGirl Campaign – Unstoppable

about

This video is part of the #LikeAGirl campaign by Always, a brand of feminine hygiene products. The campaign aims to keep girls’ confidence high during puberty and into adulthood, since “like a girl” is often used as an insult for girls and boys, which negatively affects the confidence and self-esteem of girls from a young age and especially at puberty. This video highlights the limitations and boundaries that girls feel pressured to conform to, including the things they are expected to be able to do or not do because they are girls. For example, one girl talks about how she feels like she has been told that she cannot be brave, and another says that she cannot be the one doing the rescuing because it’s always boys doing the rescuing in stories. In the video, the girls are answering the production crew’s questions about these pressures, and are asked to write down one of the things they mentioned on the side of a white cardboard box. They are then invited to physically tear down these limitations, by breaking up or overturning the boxes. Throughout the video, messages such as “Always wants every girl to stay confident…so nothing can stop her” are shown. The video closes with the Always logo, and the message, “rewrite the rules,” and an invitation to join the #LikeAGirl campaign.

read more

Amy Schumer Birth Control ad spoof

about

First appearing on the Season 3 premiere of Comedy Central’s Inside Amy Schumer on April 21, 2015, this sketch adopts the frame of a prescription drug commercial to tackle the issue of birth control access. The sketch opens with Amy completing a frenzied morning routine while the voiceover assures “busy” viewers that the “last thing [they] want to have to worry about” is their birth control.  Despite this acknowledgment, the voiceover urges audiences (and Amy) to consult one male figure after another to “decide if birth control is right for you.”  Viewers follow Amy as she confronts her doctor, her boss, her boss’ priest, a Boy Scout, and a mailman to get their take on her situation. From here, the voiceover asks viewers “why [they] insist on having sex for fun.” When Amy finally reaches the pharmacist, she learns that her prescription does not cover refills and that she must repeat the entire process over again next month. Once Amy leaves the pharmacy, a small boy approaches the counter, asking for a gun. The pharmacist happily complies, calling after the kid, “Remember, that’s your right.”

read more