Media tagged Historical

Ali Baba Bound -- Looney Tunes

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In this 1940 episode of Looney Tunes, Porky Pig, who is working for the French Foreign Legion, gets a secret message that “Ali-Baba and his Dirty Sleeves” are going to attack the desert fort. Porky and his camel are left alone to defend the fort against Ali-Babi and his attackers, and a series of typical Looney Tunes gags ensue.

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Blackface Montage from Spike Lee's Bamboozled

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Bamboozled (2000) is a satirical film written and directed by Spike Lee. The film centers on a modern minstrel show with black actors in blackface who become an accidental success. The montage featured here is of historical film and television examples of white characters in blackface, alongside African American actors in stereotypical and racist roles. Numerous live action and cartoon depictions are featured, pointing to the prevalence of this type of extreme racism in past film and television culture.

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Carmen Miranda - Copacabana

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This is a clip from the 1947 musical comedy film Copacabana. The clip is of a musical number by the film's star Carmen Miranda, a Brazilian singer, dancer and actress who was a celebrity in the 1930s-1950s. In addition to her talent as a performer, she was also known as a sex symbol, marketed as "exotic” and a stereotypical "Brazilian bombshell." Miranda's signature costume was a  revealing dress and colorful "tutti-frutti" turban, a glamorized version of the traditional costume of poor Brazilian women of primarily African descent. Miranda first became a star in Brazil, and then in the United States, even performing at the White House. Her career was encouraged by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor Policy," which sought to improve foreign relations between the United States and Latin America though cultural exchange rather than military intervention. However, as she became more popular in the United States, Miranda became less popular in Brazil. Some Brazilians felt that she was succumbing to American commercialism. Others, particularly the upper class, believed that she was representing Brazil negatively because her image appropriated from the most economically and racially marginalized groups within Brazilian society. In addition, Miranda often played characters from many Latin America countries, and some felt that this lead United States audiences to believe that all Latin American cultures were the same. In this clip, Miranda performs a high-energy version of the Brazilian song "Tico-Tico no Fubá" while other characters-- including her character's husband, played by comedian Groucho Marx-- look on and comment about her performance.

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Do The Right Thing -- Wall of Shame (EXPLICIT)

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Do The Right Thing is a highly controversial 1989 film, written and directed by Spike Lee, about a Brooklyn neighborhood gripped by racial tension. In this scene, a young black man and his friends demand that Sal, the Italian-American proprietor of Famous Pizza, add some black celebrities to his restaurant’s wall, which operates in a mostly black neighborhood. Things quickly escalate to the point of violence.

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Free to Be You and Me

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Free To Be… You And Me was a project spanning multiple media (including a book, record album, and TV special) from the early 1970s. The main message of Free To Be is gender equality among children and their parents.  Developed by actress Marlo Thomas and feminist publication Ms. magazine, Free To Be was a reaction to rigid sex roles and cultural values of the 1950s and 1960s. Free To Be was the first children’s media project of its kind to actively confront sexual and racial stereotypes.

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