Media tagged Latino/a

I’m Latino, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Latino, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Latinos and Latinas by showing a diverse range of American Latino/a young adults talking about Latino/a identity and stereotypes. The first part of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Latino/a, but I’m not...,” and the second part shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Latino, what are you?” In the final section of the video, they talk about what it was like growing up in a Latino household. For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Latina, but I’m not Mexican,” and another says, “I’m Latina, but I’m not spicy.” One man says, “I’m Latino, but I’m not a drug dealer,” and another says, “I’m Latino, but I’m not stealing your jobs.” In the second part of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Latina and I have a masters degree,” “I’m Latina and I read comic books,” “I’m Latino and I’m a geek,” and “I’m Latino and I’m an American.” In the final section, they talk about growing up Latino/Latina, including the cultures, music, food, and rituals of their families, and Latino/Latina and American identity.

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“I’m Latino. I’m Hispanic. And they’re different, so I drew a comic to explain.”

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Above is an excerpt from "You Say Latino," a comic artist Terry Blas created to define and talk about common confusion around the identity terms “Latino” and “Hispanic.” Emphasizing that the terms are not the same, and therefore not to be used interchangeably, he uses his personal experiences growing up in what he calls a bicultural household (his father is from Utah in the U.S., and his mother is from Ameca Meca, Mexico), and traveling in different parts of the U.S. and Mexico. He explains that “Latino” is about geography and being from Latin America, whereas “Hispanic” is about language, and being from a country whose primary language is Spanish. He uses being from Brazil, a Latin American country whose main language is Portuguese, and Spain, not a Latin American country, but whose main language is Spanish, as examples illustrating how the Latino and Hispanic identity terms describe different things. The comic ends with a reference to a young Terry understanding the difference between Latino and Hispanic, but wanting to know the difference between the terms “queer” and “gay.”

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Jennifer Lopez - Maid in Manhattan

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This 2002 romantic comedy features a hotel maid who captures the heart of a high profile politician when he mistakes her for a wealthy hotel guest. It is a modern day Cinderella story of two lovers that get caught between the restrictions of a class-based society, while it adds a racialized element to the tale – a white actor (Ralph Fiennes) plays the politician, and the maid (Jennifer Lopez) is Latina.

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Jennifer Lopez-Waiting for Tonight

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This music video from mega-popstar Jennifer Lopez was released in 1999 as a Billboard Top 100 single off her debut album. The video begins with shots of a lush jungle setting followed by images of a distant city. Lopez and her girlfriends seem to float between these two worlds. The video portrays Lopez as an "everygirl" preparing for a big night out to celebrate the new millenium. The video intersperses cuts of Lopez primping and scrutinizing herself in the mirror with scenes of her dancing in the jungle setting. The lines between the jungle and the nightclub are clearly blurred, with Lopez and her friends occupying both spaces. The lyrics describe how she's been waiting for so long for a chance to be with her crush and how she hopes that the chance to be with him tonight will end "the days when the sun used to set/ On my empty heart all alone in my bed." As the song climaxes, Lopez emerges soaking-wet from a pool of water.

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Modern Family - Sofia Vergara

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This video is a compilation of clips from the ABC TV sitcom Modern Family, which has aired since 2009.  Each clip features Colombian actress Sofia Vergara as her character Gloria (Delgado) Pritchett. Gloria speaks with a very thick accent and mispronounces a number of English words.  This way of speaking is one of Gloria’s signature traits on the show.

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