Media tagged Latino/a

People of Color Recreate Iconic Movie Posters

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This 2015 short film made by Buzzfeed, a pop culture website, showcases people of color recreating the posters of popular movies. Minority groups such as South and East Asians, African Americans, and members of the LBGTQ community are featured in the re-creations, including movie posters for “Mean Girls” (2004), “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961), “Titanic” (1997), “Blue is the Warmest Color” (2013), and “The Breakfast Club” (1985). In between posters, statistics about the underrepresentation of minorities in Hollywood and in the media play across the screen and over the images of the new “actors,” who are dressed in the original costumes that their white counterparts wore for their roles. While some of the statistical facts deal with the idea that minorities are underrepresented numbers-wise, the video also states that the “few roles that cast Asians rarely diverge from existing stereotypes,” which not only calls into question underrepresentation but misrepresentation and the larger issue of the lack of diversity of roles in Hollywood. At the end of the video, we see a collection of the new actors together with the words “Aren’t these movies beautiful in color?,” prompting viewers to think about the “color” (or lack thereof) they see in current films and what they would look like re-envisioned on a more diverse landscape.

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Roles of Latinas in Movies

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This poster advertises the New York Latino Film Festival. It features an infographic depicting the kinds of jobs Latina characters have in movies to demonstrate the frequency with which they appear as maids, as opposed to other professions. The tag line of the poster reads, "Films and Movies. Come See the Difference." At the very bottom of the poster are the logos of the various sponsors of the film festival.

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Selena-Mexican Americans

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In the 1997 biopic Selena, Jennifer Lopez stars as Selena, the Texas-born, Mexican-American singer-songwriter who became known as “The Queen of Tejano Music.” This clip portrays a young Selena and her brother on tour with their father, who decides to lecture his children about the unique pressures faced by American people of Mexican descent. He explains the ways in which they are expected to be “authentic” members of two cultures at the same time: “We’ve gotta prove to the Mexicans how Mexican we are, and we’ve gotta prove to the Americans how American we are… we’ve gotta be twice as perfect as anybody else."

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Shackles of Sex: Stereotypes of Latinas in Film

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"Shackles of Sex: Stereotypes of Latinas in Film and Media" is a short documentary created and directed by Jessica Beltran. It concerns the problem of Latina stereotypes in the media. Beltran singles out the “spitfire,” the “female clown,” and the “dark lady,” as three prevalent Latina stereotypes, and argues that these stereotypes are characterized by negative traits such as hypersexualisation, lack of education or intelligence, and laziness. For Beltran, these stereotypes are problematic as they are negative representations with no actual basis in reality, and they are limiting to Latina actors and Latina women generally. In response to these problems, the documentary suggests that Latinas would like to see themselves reflected in the media through new stereotypes – as intelligent, heroes, bankers, educated. In order to achieve this change, it is suggested that viewers boycott networks they find offensive, as well as learn to be critical viewers of media.

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Shakira - Hips Don't Lie

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This is a music video for 2006’s “Hips Don’t Lie,” by Colombian singer Shakira and Haitian rapper Wyclef Jean. It was a salsa and reggaeton-influenced international hit pop song. The theme of the video is a carnival or festival atmosphere, and features Shakira’s signature sensual belly-dancing in various outfits and configurations throughout the video. The song is essentially about a woman telling a man to “read the signs of (her) body” because her “hips don’t lie” in suggesting what she wants from him. Wyclef’s lyrics include stating that the way she moves her body and hips are so suggestive that they make him want to speak Spanish, ostensibly because Shakira is from Columbia and speaks Spanish (in addition to Portuguese and English). Part of the song also includes Wyclef singing simple Spanish phrases, like “como se llama” (what’s your name?), “bonita” (pretty/beautiful), “mi casa” (my house), “su casa” (your house).

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