Media tagged LGBTQ

Honey Maid: Our Dads

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This 2 minute 30 second spot highlights fathers from four different kinds of families as part of Honey Maid’s “This is Wholesome” campaign. The campaign emphasizes similarities between a range of family configurations, including families with two dads, single fathers, or fathers who have to travel or be away for long periods of time for work, showing how these seemingly “abnormal” families are also “normal” and “wholesome.” For example, the third family shown features a tattooed musician father saying, “people do think that we’re so different. But we actually have a pretty regular life in a lot of ways.” 

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I’m Asian, But I’m Not…

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“I’m Asian, But I’m Not…” is a BuzzFeed video that addresses stereotypes about Asians by showing a diverse range of Asian American young adults talking about Asian identity and stereotypes. The first half of the video shows the people finishing the statement, “I’m Asian, but I’m not..” and the second half shows them answering the question, “In addition to being Asian, what are you?” For example, in the first segment, one woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m not quiet,” and another woman says, “I’m Asian, but most people think I’m Latina.” Another woman says, “I’m Asian, but I’m fifth generation.” A man says, “I’m Asian, but I’m over six feet tall,” and another says, “I’m Asian, but I’m from Kansas.” In the second half of the video, they make statements such as, “I’m Asian, and I’m Hispanic,” “I’m Asian and I’m also an LGBT activist,” “I’m Asian and I love talking about my feelings with my parents,” “I’m Asian and a professional cyclist,” and “I’m Asian, and I’m an extrovert.” The video ends with the message: “Don’t let stereotypes define who you are.”

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“I’m Latino. I’m Hispanic. And they’re different, so I drew a comic to explain.”

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Above is an excerpt from "You Say Latino," a comic artist Terry Blas created to define and talk about common confusion around the identity terms “Latino” and “Hispanic.” Emphasizing that the terms are not the same, and therefore not to be used interchangeably, he uses his personal experiences growing up in what he calls a bicultural household (his father is from Utah in the U.S., and his mother is from Ameca Meca, Mexico), and traveling in different parts of the U.S. and Mexico. He explains that “Latino” is about geography and being from Latin America, whereas “Hispanic” is about language, and being from a country whose primary language is Spanish. He uses being from Brazil, a Latin American country whose main language is Portuguese, and Spain, not a Latin American country, but whose main language is Spanish, as examples illustrating how the Latino and Hispanic identity terms describe different things. The comic ends with a reference to a young Terry understanding the difference between Latino and Hispanic, but wanting to know the difference between the terms “queer” and “gay.”

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I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry

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This 2007 comedy starring Adam Sandler and Kevin James is about a faux gay marriage between two men who want the legal benefits of being married. The two leads negotiate maintaining the illusion of being in love with one another while somehow preserving their heterosexuality. The movie was a financial success, grossing 186 million dollars.

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It Gets Better - Love Pixar

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Produced in 2010, this clip from the major film studio Pixar takes a public stance as a part of the “It Gets Better” Campaign in support of gay rights. It features a number of its LGBT employees, and asserts that LGBT individuals are an important part of the Pixar community whose lifestyles are supported by the company.

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