Media tagged LGBTQ

Mad Men - Don Loves Roger Remix

About

In this video, scenes from seasons 1-4 of the AMC television series Mad Men are re-edited together in way that dramatically changes the plot of the show. In the real Mad Men, which takes place in a fictional advertising agency in the 1960s, characters Don and Roger are both notoriously sexist, constantly being unfaithful to their wives and disrespectful of their female coworkers. In part, audiences are expected to understand their behavior as native to the era in which the show is set, and a major theme of the series is watching Don and Roger react to the changes happening rapidly around them, including the women's rights movement. In addition, for many viewers, Don and Roger's debauched behavior is part of pleasure of the show. In this video, clips from Mad Men are stitched together so Roger's marriage ends not because of his affair with Don's secretary, but because of an affair with Don. This remix was produced by Pop Culture Pirate, an artist and activist named Elisa Kreisinger. Kreisinger is interested both in changing the meaning of texts to challenge people's assumptions and in promoting the Fair Use of copyrighted materials.

read more

McDonald's - French Ad with Gay Teen

About

In this 2010 French ad for McDonald’s, a teenage boy is portrayed secretly conversing with his lover over the phone, who we soon find out to be male. The boy’s father joins him at the table and remarks on what a shame it is that the boy’s classmates are all male – “you could have all the ladies!” Although the boy simply smiles and does not correct his father’s misunderstanding, the commercial ends with the phrase “come as you are” before transitioning to the McDonald’s logo.

read more

Mike Wallace - The Homosexuals - 1967 Documentary

About

This is an excerpt from an hour-long 1967 CBS documentary, narrated by anchor Mike Wallace, which was the first network documentary that dealt with the topic of homosexuality. It aired only once. The documentary calls homosexuality “a subject that people find disturbing and embarrassing” and describes public opinion regarding homosexuality using words and phrases like “repelled by the mere notion,” “hatred,” “and more harmful to society than adultery, abortion, and prostitution.”  Wallace interviews mental health experts (who then believed homosexuality to be a disease), law enforcement personnel (who deemed it criminal), average persons on the street, as well as individuals from within the gay community.

read more

Oprah Talks to Lea T - First Transgender Supermodel

About

In 2011, Oprah interviewed Brazilian model Lea T, who Oprah described as the world's first transgender supermodel. In the interview, they discuss Lea's journey from being born "in the wrong body" as a male, while she felt from her earliest memories that she was actually a woman. Lea discusses the complex challenges faced in her efforts to navigate social, career and family dynamics in her transition into life as a woman and a female model.

read more

People of Color Recreate Iconic Movie Posters

About

This 2015 short film made by Buzzfeed, a pop culture website, showcases people of color recreating the posters of popular movies. Minority groups such as South and East Asians, African Americans, and members of the LBGTQ community are featured in the re-creations, including movie posters for “Mean Girls” (2004), “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961), “Titanic” (1997), “Blue is the Warmest Color” (2013), and “The Breakfast Club” (1985). In between posters, statistics about the underrepresentation of minorities in Hollywood and in the media play across the screen and over the images of the new “actors,” who are dressed in the original costumes that their white counterparts wore for their roles. While some of the statistical facts deal with the idea that minorities are underrepresented numbers-wise, the video also states that the “few roles that cast Asians rarely diverge from existing stereotypes,” which not only calls into question underrepresentation but misrepresentation and the larger issue of the lack of diversity of roles in Hollywood. At the end of the video, we see a collection of the new actors together with the words “Aren’t these movies beautiful in color?,” prompting viewers to think about the “color” (or lack thereof) they see in current films and what they would look like re-envisioned on a more diverse landscape.

read more