Media tagged Mixed Race

11 Awkward Moments Indian-Americans Will Recognize

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Published in 2014, this BuzzFeed video is part of a group of videos that expose and satirize stereotypes and racial microaggressions, or the everyday, often unintentional, marginalizing interactions racial and ethnic minorities experience in the U.S. This video is also focused on articulating aspects of Indian-American identity and experiences in the U.S., featuring Anhad Singh and Michelle Khare showing how microaggression, stereotypes, and differences in cultural norms play out in everyday interactions with diverse families, friends, colleagues, and strangers. Themes addressed are difficulties identifying with and “fitting in” to limited U.S. racial identity categories, being mistaken for Latino, being confused with Native Americans, having differing levels of tolerance for food spiciness and movie length, and balancing different family and friend relationship expectations.

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“Actors of Color Get Real About What It's Like To Play a Stereotype”

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In Febuary 2015, Upworthy published a video that brought together actors of color to describe their experiences at auditions for the U.S. entertainment industry. The actors recount being told by casting directors to act in a stereotypical fashion and being typecasted based on their race and ethnicity. The clip uses personal stories to challenge accusations that the film industry is too Eurocentric and therefore, leaves few roles for actors of color to audition for. The clip cites various studies supporting the use of diverse casts stating that nearly 70% of casting calls prefer white actors, that films with relatively diverse casts excel at the box office and in returns on investment, and that television shows reflecting the nation’s diversity excel in ratings. So with potential for better ratings and better returns, the video asks viewers, “What’s the new excuse?” Upworthy is a website for viral content that promotes progressive stories tackling political and social issues.

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America's Next Top Model-Racial Mixing

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In this clip from cycle 13 of America’s Next Top Model, the final six contestants travel to Maui, Hawaii – Tyra’s chosen “exotic” location for the second half of the season. This photo shoot is held in a sugar cane field, and each of the six girls is asked represent the cultures of “two very distinct races” – for example, Botswanan and Polynesian, Tibetan and Egyptian, Mexican and Greek. Tyra and Jay explain that their inspiration for the setting and theme of the shoot is the “hapa” or multiracial heritage of the Hawaiian Islands.

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Awkward Moments Only Asians Understand

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This BuzzFeed video is part of a group of videos that expose and satirize stereotypes and racial microaggressions, or the everyday, often unintentional, marginalizing interactions racial and ethnic minorities experience in the U.S. Focused on Asian American identity and experiences of Asians in the U.S., the video features Eugene Lee Yang, Asian American BuzzFeed writer, producer, and actor showing how microaggressions and stereotypes play out in everyday interactions with diverse colleagues and friends. Themes addressed are policing of identity (e.g., “You’re such a banana” or “You’re a bad Asian”) and stereotypes about Asians (e.g., proficiency in math and technology, who can date whom, and questions about being from North or South Korea), fetishizing mixed-race people (e.g., “in general, half Asian people are the most beautiful”), who is included when talking about “Asians” (e.g. “I saw your (video). As an Indian, where was the rest of Asia?”), among many others. Additionally, there are several frames in which the Asian or Asian American characters are shown taking photographs of themselves with non-Asian friends, and the automatic face recognition feature on the camera singles out the Asians and asks, “Did someone blink?,” commenting on racial biases built into the design of technology.

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Being 12 - "Because I'm Latino, I Can't Have Money?"

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This video features the voices of a diverse group of 12-year-olds from West Side Collaborative Middle School in New York City talking about their experiences with race, racial identity, and racism. The featured students speak about their backgrounds, families, experiences with discrimination and stereotyping, and the confusion, fears, anxieties, and racial injustices they face in their everyday lives. The video is part of a multimedia project called Being 12: The Year Everything Changes, produced by pubic radio station WNYC.

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