Media tagged Online Media

Comediennes Talk Ageism in Hollywood

About

This roundtable discussion was featured on the website forThe Hollywood Reporter(THR.com) in 2009. It highlights successful female comedic actresses – including Julia Louis Dreyfuss, Amy Poehler and Christina Applegate, among others – discussing the ways that their age has impacted the types of roles for which they are considered (or, quite often, not considered) in Hollywood.

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#CoverTheAthlete

About

This video is part of the #CoverTheAthlete campaign which aims to highlight and change the biased questioning, commentary, and media coverage of female athletes, which tends to trivialize their accomplishments and focus on their looks. The video features male athletes responding negatively to being asked the same kinds of sexist interview questions that female athletes frequently face, such as questions about appearance, hair styles, weight gain, dating and love life, and being asked to show off their outfit. The video states “Male sports coverage would never sound like this. How come female coverage does?,” and ends with a clip of 20 year-old Canadian tennis player Eugenie Bouchard at the 2015 Australian Open, where a male reporter, Ian Cohen, said, “Can you give us a twirl and tell us about your outfit?” The video ends with the words, “Ask the media to #CoverTheAthlete.”

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Criticizing the way women speak - uptalk, vocal fry, “sorry,” “just”

about

This 2015 video shows writer, producer, and comedian Akilah Hughes responding to popular cultural critiques of how women speak, including vocal fry, uptalk, and saying “sorry” and “just.” The satirical video is presented as a newscast in a segment called, “This Shouldn’t Be News,” and Akilah Hughes takes us through a series of ways that women’s speaking patterns are scrutinized, sometimes publically by prominent, influential, successful women, and how this scrutiny and policing does not apply to men’s speaking patterns. She closes the segment by talking about gender income inequality, the historic and systemic privileging of men in corporate culture, and how women are graduating college at a higher rate.

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Dear Young Man of Color - spoken word film

about

“Dear Young Man of Color” is a spoken word piece written and performed by poet Fong Tran that takes the form of a letter to young men of color, addressing systemic, institutional, interpersonal, internalized, and intersectional racial, gender, and class oppression. Speaking from the center of a group of young men of color standing with and framing him, Tran covers topics such as the criminalization of black and brown bodies, the impact of African American, Latino, Asian, and class stereotypes, cultural appropriation, intersectional race, class, and gender oppression, colonization, immigration, the school to prison pipeline, police brutality, and resiliency and activism against oppression. The text of his original poem can be found here.

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Elton John - Censored Magazine Cover

About

In 2011, a Harps Grocery store in Arkansas blocked the cover of an US Weekly Magazine that featured Elton John, his husband David Furnish, and their new baby, Zachary. Placed over their faces was a sign that read: "Family Shield. To protect young Harps shoppers." In an effort to bring attention to the sign, a Twitter user snapped a photo and began to tweet a message to celebrities that were supportive of gay rights issues. It soon went viral online, forcing the Harps Grocery to respond, and eventually to take down the "Family Shield" signs. 

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