Media tagged Race & Ethnicity

Blacking Up: Hip-Hop's Remix of Race and Identity

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This trailer comes from the 2010 documentary, "Blacking Up: Hip-Hop's Remix of Race and Identity", produced by filmmaker and professor Robert Clift. As described in the film's promotional materials, "The film presents a diverse group of white rap fans (often referred to by derogatory terms such as “wannabe” or “wigger”) and performers with very different ways of expressing their relationship to Hip-Hop music and culture." With contributions from amateurs, professionals like Vanilla Ice, and African American scholars Amiri Baraka, the film investigates key questions about whites and the world of hip-hop: "When is it adoration, and when is it mockery?" the narrator ponders. "When is it fun and when is it blacking up?"

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Black. White.

About

This reality show was featured on the FX network in 2006. The plot involvesa black family and a white family trading places (and race) through the use of heavy makeup. The idea is that they will have a chance to experience the day-to-day life of a person of another race. The show was produced by Ice Cube and RJ Cutler. Ultimately, the “reality” show was based on a false premise, as the white family was actually composed of professional actors. Black. White. received mixed reviews, as many believed that on makeup was hardly all it took for one to truly understand what life is like living as a person of a different race.

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Black Women Run Hollywood

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Black Women Run Hollywood is a satirical video posted June 22, 2014 on Youtube, which ridicules racial inequality in the entertainment industry by ironically depicting power as being concentrated in a group of black women despite real world concerns about the lack of diversity in films and systemic discrimination in the entertainment industry. In the video, an African-American actress is taken to a secret underground lair to learn the truth behind Hollywood’s leaders. Actresses Meagan Good, Alfre Woodard, Retta, and Loretta Devine attempt to recruit Jurnee Smollett into their “secret society.” Before Journee agrees to join, the ringleaders of the group ask questions that establish the reasons behind their organization’s existence: Have you ever wondered why black women play such minor roles in movies? Or why black women are not directors or producers?

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Burger King-My Way

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This black and white Burger King print ad features the face of an African American man with braids. His expression could be considered tough or aggressive, as he is stares down the camera. The blurb on the bottom of the ad speaks to the man’s philosophy, in which he talks about his “customized ride” and, working from Burger King's slogan, how he will not have his burger any other way than his own way.

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Carmen Miranda - Copacabana

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This is a clip from the 1947 musical comedy film Copacabana. The clip is of a musical number by the film's star Carmen Miranda, a Brazilian singer, dancer and actress who was a celebrity in the 1930s-1950s. In addition to her talent as a performer, she was also known as a sex symbol, marketed as "exotic” and a stereotypical "Brazilian bombshell." Miranda's signature costume was a  revealing dress and colorful "tutti-frutti" turban, a glamorized version of the traditional costume of poor Brazilian women of primarily African descent. Miranda first became a star in Brazil, and then in the United States, even performing at the White House. Her career was encouraged by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor Policy," which sought to improve foreign relations between the United States and Latin America though cultural exchange rather than military intervention. However, as she became more popular in the United States, Miranda became less popular in Brazil. Some Brazilians felt that she was succumbing to American commercialism. Others, particularly the upper class, believed that she was representing Brazil negatively because her image appropriated from the most economically and racially marginalized groups within Brazilian society. In addition, Miranda often played characters from many Latin America countries, and some felt that this lead United States audiences to believe that all Latin American cultures were the same. In this clip, Miranda performs a high-energy version of the Brazilian song "Tico-Tico no Fubá" while other characters-- including her character's husband, played by comedian Groucho Marx-- look on and comment about her performance.

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