Media tagged Comedy & Satire

Awkward Moments Only Asians Understand

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This BuzzFeed video is part of a group of videos that expose and satirize stereotypes and racial microaggressions, or the everyday, often unintentional, marginalizing interactions racial and ethnic minorities experience in the U.S. Focused on Asian American identity and experiences of Asians in the U.S., the video features Eugene Lee Yang, Asian American BuzzFeed writer, producer, and actor showing how microaggressions and stereotypes play out in everyday interactions with diverse colleagues and friends. Themes addressed are policing of identity (e.g., “You’re such a banana” or “You’re a bad Asian”) and stereotypes about Asians (e.g., proficiency in math and technology, who can date whom, and questions about being from North or South Korea), fetishizing mixed-race people (e.g., “in general, half Asian people are the most beautiful”), who is included when talking about “Asians” (e.g. “I saw your (video). As an Indian, where was the rest of Asia?”), among many others. Additionally, there are several frames in which the Asian or Asian American characters are shown taking photographs of themselves with non-Asian friends, and the automatic face recognition feature on the camera singles out the Asians and asks, “Did someone blink?,” commenting on racial biases built into the design of technology.

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Bic Pens for Women - Ellen

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In this 2012 clip from The Ellen DeGeneres Show, host Ellen mocks a new product, Bic for Her, a line of pens marketed to women. She points out various attributes of the pens: that they come in "lady colors" pink and purple, are "designed to fit a women's hand," and "cost twice as much" as other pens. She then, jokingly, tells the studio audience that she was asked to star in a commercial for the pens. The show then cuts to a skit, a parody commercial in which Ellen plays a mother, walking along the beach with her adolescent daughter, having a "heart to heart" conversation about growing up and using Bic for Her pens. The bit was part of a larger public reaction against Bic for Her pens, including many satirical user-generated reviews on Amazon and much commentary on blogs and other media outlets.

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Boys Will Be Girls (Harvard Sailing Team)

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“Boys Will Be Girls” is a sketch comedy produced by the Harvard Sailing Team (a New York sketch comedy troupe) whose members take part in a conversation stereotypical of female friend groups. Much of their conversation revolves around eating--whether they should eat during the show, what they ate earlier in the day, whether they'll eat when they go out later with their girlfriends, whether they should share something to eat, whether they should go on a diet.

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Chappelle Show- Racial Draft

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This 2004 satirical clip from the Chappelle Show begins with a discussion of arguments related to multiracial identity. "We have got to start arguing about who is what,” Chappelle says. “We need to settle this once and for all. We need to have a draft." Following the style of a draft for the NFL or NBA, one by one a representative from different racial and ethnic groups comes to the podium, selecting famous athletes, entertainers and other prominent social figures to “officially” be a part of their racial group. Among the picks, Tiger Woods is claimed by African Americans, Lenny Kravitz by Jews, and the Wu Tang Clan by the Asian delegation.

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Chris Rock Hosts Academy Awards

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This is an excerpt from the 77th Academy Awards ceremony hosted by actor and comedian Chris Rock in 2005. In this skit, Rock suggests that there is a discrepancy between the movies celebrated by the Academy and nominated for Best Picture, and the movies that are most popular and enjoyed by everyday viewers. He furthers this contrast by visiting the Magic Johnson Theaters, a cineplex in downtown Los Angeles, to ask audiences to name their favorite movie of the year. The African American audience members list movies such as “Alien vs Predator,” “Saw 2,” "Chronicles of Riddick,” and "White Chicks," none of which were nominated for Academy Awards. When he asks whether they have seen the movies nominated for Best Picture such as “Sideways,” “Million Dollar Baby,” and “Finding Neverland” they all say ‘no," and even scoff at the suggestion that these movies might be among their favorites. Mid-way through the skit, he interviews Academy member and actor, Albert Brooks, who has seen all the nominated movies but emphatically and ironically claims "White Chicks" was the best movei of the year. The skit ends with a shot of actor and comedian Martin Lawrence, defiantly claiming that he is deserving of an Oscar statuette. 

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