Media tagged Comedy & Satire

Comediennes Talk Ageism in Hollywood

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This roundtable discussion was featured on the website forThe Hollywood Reporter(THR.com) in 2009. It highlights successful female comedic actresses – including Julia Louis Dreyfuss, Amy Poehler and Christina Applegate, among others – discussing the ways that their age has impacted the types of roles for which they are considered (or, quite often, not considered) in Hollywood.

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Cosmopolitan - Parody Cover

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Originally published on Cracked.com in 2010, this image is a parody cover of a typical women’s magazine such as Cosmopolitan. Using the familiar style and rhetoric of women’s magazine covers, this image makes a visual argument about the undermining effect that such publications have on women’s self-esteem and confidence.

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Criticizing the way women speak - uptalk, vocal fry, “sorry,” “just”

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This 2015 video shows writer, producer, and comedian Akilah Hughes responding to popular cultural critiques of how women speak, including vocal fry, uptalk, and saying “sorry” and “just.” The satirical video is presented as a newscast in a segment called, “This Shouldn’t Be News,” and Akilah Hughes takes us through a series of ways that women’s speaking patterns are scrutinized, sometimes publically by prominent, influential, successful women, and how this scrutiny and policing does not apply to men’s speaking patterns. She closes the segment by talking about gender income inequality, the historic and systemic privileging of men in corporate culture, and how women are graduating college at a higher rate.

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Dave Chapelle-Wayne Brady

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This clip comes from an episode of Chapelle’s Show in which Wayne Brady has taken over as host. Chappelle returns, demands his show back, and refuses to co-host with Brady due to the fact that the two “do different things.” To illustrate, Chapelle flashes back to a clip of the two hanging out a few months back. The remainder of the clip depicts Chappelle and Brady driving around and getting into all sorts of trouble, comedically instigated by Brady. Over the course of the evening, Brady pulls up outside a club and shoots several people, drives up to a group of his “hoes” to collect money, forces Chapelle to smoke PCP, breaks the neck of a police officer, and shoots Chappelle in the leg. The clip reverses the persona typically embodied by the family-friendly Brady, and is a response to the characterNegrodamus’previous quote, “White people love Wayne Brady because he makes Bryant Gumbel look like Malcolm X.”

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Dave Chapelle-White People Can't Dance

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In the introduction to this sketch from Season 2 of the Chappelle show, aired in 2004, Dave Chappelle recounts some of the negative feedback that he had received for presenting what he refers to as “racially charged sketches.” He concedes that stereotypical jokes can often lack subtly, and for this sketch, decides to reassess the idea that “white people can’t dance” – a stereotype often perpetuated by whites and blacks alike. Chappelle puts forth his hypothesis: white people can indeed dance as long as they’re listening to the right music. With help from guitarist John Mayer, Chappelle tests his hypothesis in a variety of settings, including a “control group” of Latino and African Americans. The final scene includes an “impromptu” encounter with a pair of police officers - one black and one white - and concludes with the maxim, “people of earth, no matter what your instrument, keep dancing.”

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