Media tagged Comedy & Satire

How to be a female pop star in 2014

About

This 2014 short film made and released by The Guardian, a British news outlet, shows Guardian editor Harriet Gibsone satirically listing the ways one can become a famous female pop star in order to highlight pressing issues pertaining to women and gender inequality, such as overt sexual objectification, male domination, limited feminism discussions, pay inequality, and ageism. Gibsone presents her argument in a serious tone, although the picture inserts and sound effects are comedic. In suggesting absurd things such as using a “man to help you pen a song about your body” to create a “defining” song, or “going on Twitter and slag someone off…ideally another woman,” Gibsone uses sarcasm to criticize the overt emphasis on the hyper-sexualization of the female body and the woman-eat-woman mentality emphasized in the public realm when it comes to female celebrities and pop stars. Through this satirical video, she is not actually telling viewers to do these things; she is pointing out and discussing a culture that promotes this behavior. Although this video was originally made for British audiences, viewers around the world are prompted to consider pop stars in their countries and compare these themes of confining gender roles and the “recipe for success” outlined in the video.

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If Asians Said the Stuff White People Say

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This BuzzFeed video is part of a series of videos that call out and satirize stereotypes and racial microaggressions, or the everyday, often unintentional, marginalizing interactions racial and ethnic minorities experience in the U.S.

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If Black People Said the Stuff White People Say

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This BuzzFeed video is part of a series of videos that call out and satirize stereotypes and racial microaggressions, or the everyday, often unintentional, marginalizing interactions racial and ethnic minorities experience in the U.S.

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In and Out

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This is a scene from the 1997 film "In and Out," a gay romantic comedy. It stars Kevin Kline as a high school drama teacher who is forced to question his sexuality after a former student thanks and outs him as gay during the widely televised Academy Awards. In the process of confronting and questioning his own sexual identity, Kline's character purchases and listens to a "self-help" tape on “how to be a man." The tape tests him on (and, by extension, underscores the validity of) every stereotypical masculine behavior. Kline fails every test of "manhood" as prescribed by the tape.

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I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry

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This 2007 comedy starring Adam Sandler and Kevin James is about a faux gay marriage between two men who want the legal benefits of being married. The two leads negotiate maintaining the illusion of being in love with one another while somehow preserving their heterosexuality. The movie was a financial success, grossing 186 million dollars.

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