Media tagged Television

Fresh Off the Boat--promo

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This May 2014 ad promoted a new ABC Television Network's comedy series called “Fresh off the Boat." Inspired by food personality Eddie Huang, this was the first sitcom in 20 years to center on an Asian American family. Struggling to fit in to their new hometown of Orlando, Florida, eleven-year-old Eddie Huang and his family must adapt to the untried circumstances that come along with living out “The American Dream.” Battling to fit in at school, Eddie changes up his wardrobe and what he packs in his lunches, while his mother must learn to adjust to the suburban culture of supermarkets and dog walking, and Eddie's father tries to figure out the key to success in his new Cattleman's Ranch Seakhouse restaurant.

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Get Smart - The Claw

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This clip comes from a 1965 episode of Get Smart titled “Diplomat’s Daughter.” In it, Agent Maxwell Smart meets the villain The Claw, who is supposed to be Chinese. The Claw is played by white actor Leonard Strong, who was known for playing Asian roles. This clip is demonstrative of early television depictions of Asian people and cultures, with stereotypical and exaggerated accent, clothing, and behavior, and white actors in “yellow face.” The main source of humor in this clip is drawn from the stereotypical accent, as The Claw does not correctly pronounce his own name in English. Smart picks up on this, and refers to The Claw as “Mr. Craw” throughout the entirety of the clip. The clip also demonstrates Orientalist-like notions regarding the savagery of the East, with its portrayal of “Chinese bamboo stalks under the fingernails torture.”

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Girfriends - "Oh Hell No!"

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This compilation of clips from UPN/The CW's Girlfriends (2000-2008) was uploaded to Youtube in 2011. Created by an African American woman, Mara Brock Akil, the show was a highly successful sitcom that was particularly popular during its run with African American young adult women. In this clip, the characters are depicted reacting to any number of situations with the refrain: “Oh, hell no!”

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GoldieBlox and Rube Goldberg “Princess Machine” ad

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This 2103 advertisement is for GoldieBlox, a toy company that makes engineering toys for girls with the mission of getting girls building. The company was founded by Debbie Sterling, a Stanford University trained mechanical engineer who wanted to “disrupt the pink aisle” and provide girls with more options for toys beyond dolls and princesses. The ad shows three girls watching a stereotypically girly and pink television advertisement with unimpressed looks of boredom and inability to relate on their faces. The background music changes as the girls grab tool belts, hardhats, and safety goggles, and are then shown participating in a complex Rube Goldberg “Princess Machine,” where a series of deliberately engineered chain reactions turn objects from the inside and outside of the house into a fun, complex contraption used to ultimately change the channel from the stereotypical tv commercial at the beginning of the ad. The new commercial the girls see shows Goldie the cartoon character from GoldieBlox who is a kid inventor that loves to build, and advertises the company’s engineering toys with the tagline, “toys for future engineers.” The video ends with the three girls in the living room where they started, wearing the tool belt, hardhat, and safety goggles and standing with arms crossed and expectant looks on their faces.

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Gossip Girl Promo

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"Gossip Girl" is a television teen drama series that ran from 2007 to 2012. In this promo from a season two, upper-class protagonist Serena (played by Blake Lively) and middle-class poet Dan (played by Penn Badgely) are on a bus. Serena instigates a series of increasingly seductive gestures, first offering him a magazine,  biting into a chocolate-covered strawberry and voraciously sucking her fingers, falling into his lap, and finally grabbing him and leading him towards the bus toilet where they hook up. The controvesial promo was part of a larger campaign designed to be  shocking and provocative, using taglines such as "OMFG!" on billboards and posters. The campaign also appropriated negative press received from watchdog groups ("mind blowingly inappropriate" and "bad for you"), and turned the criticsim around as a way to brand the show and its racy content.

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