Media tagged Working/Lower Class

Carmen Miranda - Copacabana

About

This is a clip from the 1947 musical comedy film Copacabana. The clip is of a musical number by the film's star Carmen Miranda, a Brazilian singer, dancer and actress who was a celebrity in the 1930s-1950s. In addition to her talent as a performer, she was also known as a sex symbol, marketed as "exotic” and a stereotypical "Brazilian bombshell." Miranda's signature costume was a  revealing dress and colorful "tutti-frutti" turban, a glamorized version of the traditional costume of poor Brazilian women of primarily African descent. Miranda first became a star in Brazil, and then in the United States, even performing at the White House. Her career was encouraged by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor Policy," which sought to improve foreign relations between the United States and Latin America though cultural exchange rather than military intervention. However, as she became more popular in the United States, Miranda became less popular in Brazil. Some Brazilians felt that she was succumbing to American commercialism. Others, particularly the upper class, believed that she was representing Brazil negatively because her image appropriated from the most economically and racially marginalized groups within Brazilian society. In addition, Miranda often played characters from many Latin America countries, and some felt that this lead United States audiences to believe that all Latin American cultures were the same. In this clip, Miranda performs a high-energy version of the Brazilian song "Tico-Tico no Fubá" while other characters-- including her character's husband, played by comedian Groucho Marx-- look on and comment about her performance.

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Chrysler Ad: Halftime in America - Clint Eastwood

About

"Halftime in America" is an advertisement commissioned by Chrysler that aired during the Super Bowl in 2012. Over a gently swelling orchestral soundtrack, Clint Eastwood performs a monologue comparing the economic recession to a football game. Many audience members would recognize the voice of Clint Eastwood in this ad -- the famous actor is known for portraying tough, masculine characters. The text of the speech, and Eastwood's performance, reflects the kind of "pump up" speech that a football coach or a captain might give in the locker room to inspire a losing team before returning to the field to play the second half of a game. The ad describes the Chrysler corporation, the auto industry in general, Detroit (the "Motor City"), and the United States as a fighter that has been knocked down and must rally to get back up. As Eastwood puts it near the conclusion, "This country can't be knocked out by one punch." Visually, the ad is made up a montage of industrial laborers intercut with people of various ages and races driving, working, and spending time with families.

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Dear Young Man of Color - spoken word film

about

“Dear Young Man of Color” is a spoken word piece written and performed by poet Fong Tran that takes the form of a letter to young men of color, addressing systemic, institutional, interpersonal, internalized, and intersectional racial, gender, and class oppression. Speaking from the center of a group of young men of color standing with and framing him, Tran covers topics such as the criminalization of black and brown bodies, the impact of African American, Latino, Asian, and class stereotypes, cultural appropriation, intersectional race, class, and gender oppression, colonization, immigration, the school to prison pipeline, police brutality, and resiliency and activism against oppression. The text of his original poem can be found here.

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Dodge Charger Ad

About

This Dodge Charger ad was aired during the broadcast for the 2010 Super Bowl. The commercial features images of defeated and exhausted-looking men, as a voiceover explains all the things that the men do every day in order to make the women in their lives happy. In the world in which this commercial takes place, women have gained power over men, making them feel emasculated and confined. In response, the man demands to drive the car that he wants to drive: a Dodge Charger, described as a “Man’s Last Stand”.

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Do The Right Thing -- Wall of Shame (EXPLICIT)

about

Do The Right Thing is a highly controversial 1989 film, written and directed by Spike Lee, about a Brooklyn neighborhood gripped by racial tension. In this scene, a young black man and his friends demand that Sal, the Italian-American proprietor of Famous Pizza, add some black celebrities to his restaurant’s wall, which operates in a mostly black neighborhood. Things quickly escalate to the point of violence.

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